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Native American Engagement Rings

NATIVE AMERICAN ENGAGEMENT RINGS. BEST PLACE FOR ENGAGEMENT RING. TITANIUM PROMISE RINGS FOR MEN

Native American Engagement Rings

native american engagement rings
    engagement rings
  • Especially in Western cultures, an engagement ring is a ring indicating that the person wearing it is engaged to be married. In the United Kingdom, and North America, engagement rings are traditionally worn only by women, and rings can feature gemstones.
  • A ring given by a man to a woman when they agree to marry
  • Platinum and 18K/14K Gold Unique and Antique Style Diamond Wedding Ring Sets Wedding Anniversary Bands Solitaire Engage Rings Modern Engagement Jewelry Custom Made Items With Princess-cut Diamond Desiner Inspired Engagement Handmade Crafted Bridal Rings Uniquely Custom-Made Designed Engagement Rings
    native american
  • A member of any of the indigenous peoples of the Americas
  • Amerindian: any member of the peoples living in North or South America before the Europeans arrived
  • The indigenous peoples of the Americas are the pre-Columbian inhabitants of North and South America, their descendants, and many ethnic groups who identify with those peoples.
  • Indian: of or pertaining to American Indians or their culture or languages; "Native American religions"; "Indian arrowheads"
native american engagement rings – Southwestern Native
Southwestern Native American Handmade Lone Mountain Turquoise and Diamond Turtle Ring in 18kt. Gold by Navajo Artist Vernon Haskie, #9773
Southwestern Native American Handmade Lone Mountain Turquoise and Diamond Turtle Ring in 18kt. Gold by Navajo Artist Vernon Haskie, #9773
Exquisite! Master jeweler Vernon Haskie is an award winning artist who creates singular pieces of art with unparalleled attention to detail. This 18kt. gold ring features five turtles, created in the overlay technique. Each turtle, the symbol of mother earth and long life, is set with a brilliant white diamond. Vernon has set a beautiful stone of Lone Mountain Turquoise, noted for it’s color, atop this ring as a finishing touch. Even the bezel is a piece of art. ‘World class’ describe both this young Navajo artist and his jewelry. Ring is a size 9 and measures 1 1/4″ wide with the stone and tapers to 3/8″ wide at the back of the shank. Signed by the artist. Native American Indian handcrafted. Steven Skeets has created a number of superior two tone Hopi style wedding bands that will last for generations. See the Taos Trading Storefront for a great selection of jewelry designs and styles.

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Mermaid's Eye Wampum Jewerly Earrings, 2004
Mermaid's Eye Wampum Jewerly Earrings, 2004
Mermaid’s Eye Wampum jewelry earrings, 2004, Takeshi Yamada

ARTIST’S STATEMENT

Mercenaria mercenaria – quahogs are found in estuaries along the Atlantic Coast, from Canada to Texas. The quahog shell is harder than gems like lapis lazuli and malachite, thus, it takes a high polish to turn into a first class gem. The name “quahog” is from a corruption of the Native American word for the clam, “poquauhock”. However, only the “Northern Quahog”, which is native to New England (the region comprising six states of the NE United States – Main, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Conneticut), has rich deep purple coloration in its shell. The purple color growth ring of the quahog (“Black Eye”; a form of Worry Stone) was used as an amulet, and found at the burial ground of the Native Americans 4,000 years old. And purple is what makes the most-desirable wampum among Native Americans. “Wampum” is a contraction of the Algonquian word “wampumpeage” or “white shell beads strung on a cord.” Wampum was the material object absolutely necessary for the successful functioning of political (diplomacy and diplomatic protocol), social, and religious life among Native Americans. They wore single strands of wampum as ornament. They also wore belts on which purple and white beads were woven into pictorial messages (sophisticated icons). Because purple shell was harder to find, and harder to work, purple wampum was worth twice as much as white. The Ayonwata Wampum Treaty Belt of the Haudonoshaunee (Hiawatha Iroquois Wampum Belt) is the most famous of the wampum belts, joining the Haudonoshaunee (People of the Longhouse) possibly over 1000 years ago. Among Native Americans, the Quahog has been considered as a beautiful and sacred clam as one of the main “passport” to the spirit world.

This clam, which could live 40 years or more, is known to feed Founding Fathers from starvation. In the seafood business today, small quahogs are known as “littlenecks”, larger ones are called “cherrystones” and quahogs over four inches wide are called “chowders.” After contacting North American natives in the early 1600s, European traders and settlers used wampum beads as money. In the 17th Century, wampum was the official currency of the New Amsterdam (now, New York) and other states, and you could even use wampum to pay your taxes to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and pay your tuition at Harvard College then. With this in mind, in 1758, Linneaus himself gave the scientific name in Latin to the quahog meaning “money/wage”. Today, an extract from the quahog called mercenine is discovered as a strong growth inhibitor of cancers in mice, and researchers are investigating its power to be used as the next generation of penicillin.

With these unique and distinctive historical and cultural background of quahog in this region of the United States, and with Japanese medieval day’s game called Kaiawase (Clamshell Matching) among high society of Samurai and nobles, I created a series of artworks such as sculptures, jewelry, paintings, prints, drawings, and computer graphics since 2002, when I moved to Coney Island area of Brooklyn, NY, and started harvesting this beautiful marine creature here.

It is my hope that my artworks are the vehicles to please the eyes, uplift the spirit, stir the imagination and express conviction. It is my desire to promote a greater understanding and appreciation of the importance of the global nature of the world, its people and the bonds that mutually bind them. It is my sincere wish that my creativity and its products contribute to the advancement of the glorious culture based on the sanctity of life and true humanism.

About Wampum:
In a broader sense, Wampum is an English word for gems from the shell of the quahog clam (Mercenaria mercenaria), which Native Americans called ‘poquauhock’. The quahog shell is harder than gems like lapis lazuli and malachite. It also takes a high polish; it is truly a first class gem. “Wampum” is a contraction of the Algonquian word “wampumpeage” or “white shell beads strung on a cord.” Wampum was the material object absolutely necessary for the successful functioning of political (diplomacy and diplomatic protocol), social, and religious life among Native Americans. Not only did they wear single strands of wampum as ornaments but they also wore belts on which purple and white beads were woven into pictorial messages (sophisticated icons). Because purple shell was harder to find, and harder to work, purple wampum was worth twice as much as white among Native Americans. The Ayonwata Wampum Treaty Belt of the Haudonoshaunee (Hiawatha Iroquois Wampum Belt) is the most famous of the wampum belts, commemorating the joining the Haudonoshaunee (People of the Longhouse) possibly over 1000 years ago. Among Native Americans, the Quahog has been considered as a beautiful and sacred clam as one of the main “passports” to the world of ether or spirit wo

Wampum Mermaid's Eye Disc Meditation Jewelry Necklace
Wampum Mermaid's Eye Disc Meditation Jewelry Necklace
Mermaid’s Eye Wampum meditation jewelry (1.5 inch diameter) necklace, 2004, Takeshi Yamada

ARTIST’S STATEMENT

Mercenaria mercenaria – quahogs are found in estuaries along the Atlantic Coast, from Canada to Texas. The quahog shell is harder than gems like lapis lazuli and malachite, thus, it takes a high polish to turn into a first class gem. The name “quahog” is from a corruption of the Native American word for the clam, “poquauhock”. However, only the “Northern Quahog”, which is native to New England (the region comprising six states of the NE United States – Main, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Conneticut), has rich deep purple coloration in its shell. The purple color growth ring of the quahog (“Black Eye”; a form of Worry Stone) was used as an amulet, and found at the burial ground of the Native Americans 4,000 years old. And purple is what makes the most-desirable wampum among Native Americans. “Wampum” is a contraction of the Algonquian word “wampumpeage” or “white shell beads strung on a cord.” Wampum was the material object absolutely necessary for the successful functioning of political (diplomacy and diplomatic protocol), social, and religious life among Native Americans. They wore single strands of wampum as ornament. They also wore belts on which purple and white beads were woven into pictorial messages (sophisticated icons). Because purple shell was harder to find, and harder to work, purple wampum was worth twice as much as white. The Ayonwata Wampum Treaty Belt of the Haudonoshaunee (Hiawatha Iroquois Wampum Belt) is the most famous of the wampum belts, joining the Haudonoshaunee (People of the Longhouse) possibly over 1000 years ago. Among Native Americans, the Quahog has been considered as a beautiful and sacred clam as one of the main “passport” to the spirit world.

This clam, which could live 40 years or more, is known to feed Founding Fathers from starvation. In the seafood business today, small quahogs are known as “littlenecks”, larger ones are called “cherrystones” and quahogs over four inches wide are called “chowders.” After contacting North American natives in the early 1600s, European traders and settlers used wampum beads as money. In the 17th Century, wampum was the official currency of the New Amsterdam (now, New York) and other states, and you could even use wampum to pay your taxes to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and pay your tuition at Harvard College then. With this in mind, in 1758, Linneaus himself gave the scientific name in Latin to the quahog meaning “money/wage”. Today, an extract from the quahog called mercenine is discovered as a strong growth inhibitor of cancers in mice, and researchers are investigating its power to be used as the next generation of penicillin.

With these unique and distinctive historical and cultural background of quahog in this region of the United States, and with Japanese medieval day’s game called Kaiawase (Clamshell Matching) among high society of Samurai and nobles, I created a series of artworks such as sculptures, jewelry, paintings, prints, drawings, and computer graphics since 2002, when I moved to Coney Island area of Brooklyn, NY, and started harvesting this beautiful marine creature here.

It is my hope that my artworks are the vehicles to please the eyes, uplift the spirit, stir the imagination and express conviction. It is my desire to promote a greater understanding and appreciation of the importance of the global nature of the world, its people and the bonds that mutually bind them. It is my sincere wish that my creativity and its products contribute to the advancement of the glorious culture based on the sanctity of life and true humanism.

About Wampum:
In a broader sense, Wampum is an English word for gems from the shell of the quahog clam (Mercenaria mercenaria), which Native Americans called ‘poquauhock’. The quahog shell is harder than gems like lapis lazuli and malachite. It also takes a high polish; it is truly a first class gem. “Wampum” is a contraction of the Algonquian word “wampumpeage” or “white shell beads strung on a cord.” Wampum was the material object absolutely necessary for the successful functioning of political (diplomacy and diplomatic protocol), social, and religious life among Native Americans. Not only did they wear single strands of wampum as ornaments but they also wore belts on which purple and white beads were woven into pictorial messages (sophisticated icons). Because purple shell was harder to find, and harder to work, purple wampum was worth twice as much as white among Native Americans. The Ayonwata Wampum Treaty Belt of the Haudonoshaunee (Hiawatha Iroquois Wampum Belt) is the most famous of the wampum belts, commemorating the joining the Haudonoshaunee (People of the Longhouse) possibly over 1000 years ago. Among Native Americans, the Quahog has been considered as a beautiful and sacred clam as one of the main “passports” to

native american engagement rings
native american engagement rings
Nagualism: A Study in Native American Folk-lore and History (Dodo Press)
Daniel Garrison Brinton (1837-1899), was an American archaeologist and ethnologist. During the American Civil War, he was a surgeon in the Union army, acting during 1864-1865 as surgeonin- charge of the U. S. Army general hospital at Quincy, Illinois. After the war, Brinton practiced medicine in West Chester, Pennsylvania for several years; was the editor of a weekly periodical – the Medical and Surgical Reporter, in Philadelphia from 1874 to 1887; became professor of ethnology and archaeology in the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia in 1884; and was professor of American linguistics and archaeology in the University of Pennsylvania from 1886 until his death. His works include: The Myths of the New World (1868), The Religious Sentiment (1876), American Hero-Myths (1882), Aboriginal American Authors (1883), The Lenape and Their Legends (1885), The Annals of the Cakchiquels (1885), Ancient Nahuatl Poetry (1887), The Pursuit of Happiness (1893), A Primer of Mayan Hieroglyphics (1895) and Religions of Primitive People (1897). In addition, he edited and published a Library of American Aboriginal Literature (8 vols. 1882-1890), a valuable contribution to the science of anthropology in America.

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